I Put on my DM Hat

Ask me anything   I'm a 20 year old writer/psychologist in training and this is whimsical, nonsensical and uncynical collection of geeky flotsam that endears itself to my peculiar peculiarities.

Also check out http://the-doubletake.tumblr.com/ for more of my shenanigans in audio form.

neuromorphogenesis:

Canadian student has “out of body experiences” whenever she wants
After attending a lecture on “out of body experiences,” a 24-year-old student from the University of Ottawa approached her professor saying, “I thought everybody could do that.” She can apparently do this at will — making her the first person with this condition to be studied.
The resulting paper, which now appears in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, describes the condition as something of an illusion, where a person’s ability to track their body’s position in space and time has somehow become externalized. In this extraordinary case, the university student claims she can do this whenever she wants — to induce the feeling that she can experience her body moving outside the boundaries of her physical body, while remaining aware of her unmoving physical body.
So, if you’re a neuroscientist studying this particular person, what do you do? You put her in a brain scanner, of course. Writing in ABC News, Gillian Mohney explains more:

[Claude] Messier and his co-author interviewed the student and had her undergo an MRI to see if her brain activity might shed light on her unusual ability.
Messier said the girl first noticed her ability when she was a child and had a hard time going to sleep during naps. To pass the time she would “float” above her body.
"I feel myself moving, or, more accurately, can make myself feel as if I am moving. I know perfectly well that I am not actually moving," the student told the researchers. "In fact, I am hyper-sensitive to my body at that point, because I am concentrating so hard on the sensation of moving…For example, if I ‘spin’ for long enough, I get dizzy."
Messier said at some point the student’s brain showed similar activity to that of a high-level athlete who can vividly imagine themselves winning a competition. One difference, however, was that her brain activity was focused on one side, and the athletes usually show activity on both brain hemispheres.
Messier said more study was needed, but he said that this discovery could mean many more people have this ability but find it “unremarkable.” The discovery could be similar to how synesthesia, a mix of multiple senses, was discovered in a wider population.
Alternately, the ability could be something that everyone is able to do as an infant or child, but lose as they get older.

Wild stuff. Typically, this condition happens as the result of an injury, psychological illness, lesions on the brain, or from a drug that induces the illusion. The researchers speculate that this ability might be present in infancy but that it’s lost without regular practice. They also hypothesize that it’s more prevalent in young people… and that it’s a skill that might be developed.

neuromorphogenesis:

Canadian student has “out of body experiences” whenever she wants

After attending a lecture on “out of body experiences,” a 24-year-old student from the University of Ottawa approached her professor saying, “I thought everybody could do that.” She can apparently do this at will — making her the first person with this condition to be studied.

The resulting paper, which now appears in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, describes the condition as something of an illusion, where a person’s ability to track their body’s position in space and time has somehow become externalized. In this extraordinary case, the university student claims she can do this whenever she wants — to induce the feeling that she can experience her body moving outside the boundaries of her physical body, while remaining aware of her unmoving physical body.

So, if you’re a neuroscientist studying this particular person, what do you do? You put her in a brain scanner, of course. Writing in ABC News, Gillian Mohney explains more:

[Claude] Messier and his co-author interviewed the student and had her undergo an MRI to see if her brain activity might shed light on her unusual ability.

Messier said the girl first noticed her ability when she was a child and had a hard time going to sleep during naps. To pass the time she would “float” above her body.

"I feel myself moving, or, more accurately, can make myself feel as if I am moving. I know perfectly well that I am not actually moving," the student told the researchers. "In fact, I am hyper-sensitive to my body at that point, because I am concentrating so hard on the sensation of moving…For example, if I ‘spin’ for long enough, I get dizzy."

Messier said at some point the student’s brain showed similar activity to that of a high-level athlete who can vividly imagine themselves winning a competition. One difference, however, was that her brain activity was focused on one side, and the athletes usually show activity on both brain hemispheres.

Messier said more study was needed, but he said that this discovery could mean many more people have this ability but find it “unremarkable.” The discovery could be similar to how synesthesia, a mix of multiple senses, was discovered in a wider population.

Alternately, the ability could be something that everyone is able to do as an infant or child, but lose as they get older.

Wild stuff. Typically, this condition happens as the result of an injury, psychological illness, lesions on the brain, or from a drug that induces the illusion. The researchers speculate that this ability might be present in infancy but that it’s lost without regular practice. They also hypothesize that it’s more prevalent in young people… and that it’s a skill that might be developed.

— 29 seconds ago with 287 notes
nothiiw:

i love how understandably horrified and upset everyone behind tommy looks as he unleashes this ultimate burn

nothiiw:

i love how understandably horrified and upset everyone behind tommy looks as he unleashes this ultimate burn

(Source: exploitastic, via photosandwhine)

— 21 hours ago with 33703 notes

This is it. You don’t need any other gif set ever apart from this one,

(Source: madtitanx, via livewhereyoufeartolive)

— 2 days ago with 4167 notes

archiemcphee:

"She may not look like much, but she’s got it where it counts, kid."

Star Wars fan Bill Deacon transformed his 1974 Chevy Malibu into a street-legal replica of the Millennium Falcon. The road vehicle-turned-spacecraft features all sorts of great details, including HANCHWY vanity plates and a field of streaking stars around the ship’s bow on the hood and front bumper. But our favorite feature is the cockpit mounted in place of the right starboard side-view mirror that contains Han Solo and Chewbacca action figures.

[via Geekologie]

Bury me in this so I can ride to hell in style

(via livewhereyoufeartolive)

— 3 days ago with 3149 notes

bottledspider:

petermorwood:

rudesby:

I marathoned the show ‘Vikings’ last week and this was ALL I COULD THINK ABOUT.

Blood-feuds made for great saga entertainment (also novels, TV and movies) but peaceful discussion was another thing entirely. (ouch).

The first ep of Vikings cracks me up because everyone keeps saying “you going to the thing?” “hey, I’ll see you at the thing” and I wonder if anyone not up on their early medieval Scandinavian governmental systems thought that they were just being really vague

(Source: morgrana, via hisamusingworld)

— 5 days ago with 11625 notes